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DOT's LaHood Tells Congress Not to Fly Without Passing FAA Bill

August 2, 2011 By: George Dooley Travel Agent


(c) 2011 Department of Transportation

Members of Congress should not get on a plane to fly home for vacation without passing an FAA bill and putting thousands of people back to work, said U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, continuing his push for Congress to pass the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) budget.

“Congress needs to do its job for the good of these workers, for the good of our economy and for the good of America’s aviation system,”
 said LaHood.

Secretary LaHood and Federal Aviation Administration Administrator Randy Babbitt joined with local contractors and construction workers at LaGuardia Airport on Monday to demand that Congress pass an FAA bill before getting on airplanes to fly away for vacation.

Since Congress allowed the FAA’s last extension to expire on July 22, dozens of construction projects across the country have been issued “stop work orders,” including a $6 million project to demolish the decommissioned FAA Airport Traffic Control Tower at LaGuardia International Airport that employed 40 New York area workers.

According to they DOT and FAA other workers nationwide have similarly been forced to stop work on critical airport modernization projects, and nearly 4,000 FAA employees, many needed to oversee these projects, have been furloughed.

FAA's Babbitt said, “Every day this goes on, we fall further behind. We need our 4,000 FAA employees and tens of thousands of construction workers back on the job so we can get critical projects moving again while it's still construction season. Congress must act quickly before leaving for the August recess.”

Without a reauthorization, the FAA is unable to get roughly $2.5 billion out the door for airport projects in all 50 states that could put thousands of people to work in good paying jobs, the DOT says. In addition to the nearly 4,000 FAA employees in 35 states, as well as the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, who have been furloughed and forced to go without pay, Associated General Contractors (AGC) estimates that 70,000 construction workers and workers in related fields have been affected. 

The FAA’s previous extension expired at midnight on Friday, July 22. Since then, the FAA says, more than 200 “stop work orders” have been issued for airport construction projects and contracts around the country.

"While the flying public will be unaffected and safety will not be compromised, stopping work on these projects will significantly increase the ultimate costs of construction for taxpayers and could delay important programs," the DOT said.



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George Dooley
George Dooley, Travel Agent’s senior contributing editor covering retail and technology, has a long-standing reputation as one of the top travel industry journalists. He notes...

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By George Dooley | August 2, 2011
The FAA budget crisis is predicted to last all summer, threatening important construction projects and thousands of jobs.