Luisa Esquiroz Arellano

Luisa Esquiroz Arellano

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Generally known for its informal style of hospitality, the Riviera Maya, a tourism corridor that stretches for 100 miles along the Caribbean coast, from south of Cancun to the Maya ruins of Tulum, is rapidly turning into an upscale destination. Following a wave of "luxury all-inclusive" that have opened during the past 10 years, this lovely region bordered by the Caribbean Sea, is ready to target the high-end U.S. market with a number of exclusive international chains poised to open high quality EP resorts.
For a relatively young city, Miami packs quite a colorful history. This urban zone, which was born at the mouth of the Miami River on Biscayne Bay more than 100 years ago, has been enriched by waves of refugees, each contributing to a mosaic of different cultures, from the Bahamas and the Caribbean, as well as from Central and South America.
In Miami Beach, many avant-garde restaurants serve "new Cuban cuisine." These restaurants are popping up throughout South Beach—often as part of the newly renovated art moderne hotels of yesteryear. One example is the Savoy, which opened a new Latin cuisine restaurant last year. Ola on the Ocean is one of the latest ventures of Chef Douglas Rodriguez (who started the "Nuevo Latino" trend more than a decade ago with the opening of Yucca). Cuban-inspired dishes are the stars of the menu, including plantain-encrusted mahi-mahi, malaga gnocchi (a delicious Cuban root similar to the cassava) as well as the universal churrasco. Clients staying at the hotel can also order this sophisticated cuisine through room service 12 hours a day, or on the beach for lighter fare. The Savoy is putting together summer packages. Visit www.olamiami.com.
In the highlands of Guatemala the Maya people dress according to ancient traditions, each region wearing different patterns. You will find a kaleidoscope of forms and colors along this mountain route, one of the most popular in Guatemala.