Navigating the Variety of Las Vegas Nightlife

Not all Las Vegas nightlife is created equal. And, yes, that is a good thing. After all, there is no prototypical Sin City consumer looking to do exactly the same thing when the sun drops. So understanding the different offerings is critical to providing the right recommendations.

Aside from shows and concerts, there are three main categories to pay attention to when suggesting a nightlife experience: Mega Clubs, Ultra Lounges and Casino Bars.

The Mega Clubs are typically reserved for the under-40 set looking to mix it up in a packed nightclub where a DJ spins the latest hits. Admission can run up to as much as $50 per person. A reserved table with two bottles of booze (the typical minimum) can be $1,000 or more. This is for those looking for a serious party.

Ultra Lounges are usually scaled-down versions of Mega Clubs, which appeal to people looking for a similar experience without the crowds. They’re also not as loud and people who go here are usually looking to sip martinis rather than do shots and drink vodkas mixed with Red Bulls. A small admission may be applied a weekend evening.

Casino Bars are great because they feature live music and are geared to the over-30 set. The more traditional approach still leaves lots of room for fun in an atmosphere that’s pressure-free. On a recent trip to Las Vegas, we saw lots of people dancing the night away to familiar cover songs from the 1970s and 1980s.

Take Bellagio for instance. Here, the resort has The Bank, a mega club that attracts the heartiest partiers. Caramel is an intimate martini bar serving handcrafted drinks with music played at a level where conversations are still a possibility. Fontana Bar features live bands cranking out the hits people love to dance to. The night we were there, an eight-piece band—including a horn section—was belting out disco hits of the 1970s.

By understanding what kind of after-dark fun your client is looking for, you’ll be better prepared to steer them to just what’s right for them.

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