En Route to Australia Via Qantas Airlines

 

The British Airways lounge at JFK

In JFK’s Terminal 7, the British Airways business-class lounge is a very nice way to start a 22.5 hour journey. As opposed to the Swiss Lounge, this oasis is on the right side of security, so that passengers can leave the lounge when their plane starts boarding, rather than some time before. There are several rooms (some with big-screen TVs showing sporting events), a business station with printers, and— my personal favorite— a self-serve open bar. (My Bloody Mary was exactly the way I like it—lots of Tabasco!)

 

Onboard Qantas in Business Class

Onboard Qantas Airlines, the seats fold out to what can’t really be described as a fully flat bed—it’s more of an incline, with the footrest nearly on the floor. The food is very tasty (the lamb-and-tabouli salad is particularly good), and the wine is copious. (A glass of port before bed? Sure, why not?)

Even the on-demand entertainment system is well-planned, with numerous movies in multiple languages. (Great for an international clientele.)

But seriously—why are the beds angled so severely? Ah, well. I’ll take a nap before we land in Los Angeles and let you know how comfortable they are. (Of course, after the port, I get the feeling I’ll be able to sleep through earthquakes, so who knows?)

2:17 a.m., New York Time

Was able to nap a little, though I was glad for the seatbelt that kept me from sliding off the “bed.” Honestly, who thought a 40-degree tilt was a good idea for sleeping? What engineer approved this?

Even though we’re using one plane for the entire New York-to-Sydney trip, we’ve had to disembark at LAX, so I’m now sitting in a surprisingly crowded lounge, waiting to get back on the plane. From there, it’s 14 hours to Sydney and another two to Adelaide.

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