Celebrating 80 Years: Sweden in 1946

Travel Conditions in SwedenA snapshot of Sweden during World War II reveals what one might already guess: The travel industry was not booming. In March 1946, travel restrictions had been imposed and transatlantic flights were hard to come by. Once you got there — if you got there — you paid more for less, and the chance of finding a hotel was severely reduced by the housing shortage, the increasing number of refugees and the restriction of Swedish travelers to domestic resorts. (Read the full article here) Sixty-four years later, we're thrilled to have found what we were missing then.

This year, Marriott opened up two properties, and Design Hotels announced its opening of Nobis Hotel in Stockholm, constantly distinguishing itself for its archipelago and cruise industry. ICEHOTEL in Jukkasjärvi is set to launch on time in 2012. Last year, the country became the fifth to approve same-sex marriage legislation, and this summer Icelandair announced increased service from North America to Scandinavia, Continental Europe and the UK for next summer.

As we celebrate our 80th anniversary, we're taking a look at what was happening in the industry in the past and asking agents to share their thoughts on what has changed in the industry in the present. Please share your thoughts by posting a comment below, writing us at our Facebook page, sending a tweet to our Twitter page or by engaging in a discussion in real time at AgentNation (the only social community online for all kinds of travel agents, which certainly wasn't around 80 years ago). We want to hear from you.

And while you're here, learn more about how we're celebrating eight decades of covering the travel industry for travel professionals.

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