Las Vegas Adopts New Marketing Campaign

The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority (LVCVA), which is responsible for marketing southern Nevada as a tourist and convention destination, is aggressively launching a new two-year marketing plan it hopes will spur further visitation to Sin City. For those already accustomed with the "What Happens in Vegas, Stays in Vegas" tagline, fear not—that campaign is staying put, though product awareness strategies will evolve.

Music and sports will join dining, shopping and entertainment as primary areas of marketing growth, and the LVCVA will look to align with advertisers to leverage brand synergies. "As Las Vegas continues to reinvent itself, the LVCVA must continue to aggressively and effectively market the destination," says Rossi Ralenkotter, president and CEO of the LVCVA. "Our ability to generate brand awareness and to drive visitor demand depends on it."

The LVCVA also plans on bumping up marketing to the Hispanic, African-American, Asian-American and Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender markets.

In addition, travel partners will become bigger targets. Sales efforts will include more travel agent booking incentives, and education programs will be developed to ensure that Las Vegas is ingrained in the minds of all travel agents.

The LVCVA notes that the largest opportunity lies with marketing to the international community, which represents a growing segment of Las Vegas' tourism. The strategy involves honing in on 12 specific international markets, with a special focus on enhancing consumer brand marketing and public relations programs in Canada, Mexico and the United Kingdom.

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