Forrester Research Sees Travelers Angry with Web

Travelers are fed up, says Forrester Research, an independent firm, in a newly released study titled "Using Digital Channels To Calm The Angry Traveler." And that may be good news— and a challenge— for travel agents long impacted by online travel sales. Forester says there are 15 percent fewer travelers who enjoy using the web in 2009 than there were in 2007. Just one in three U.S. online travelers feels that travel websites do a good job presenting travel choices, down from 39 percent in 2008.

The research powerhouse says travelers feel that they, and their business, are taken for granted. “To reverse travelers' dissatisfaction and avoid having them abandon the web in favor of other, more expensive offline channels, travel eBusiness professionals must rethink their approach to travel eBusiness,” states the report. “To reverse this trend and re-engage travelers, travel eBusiness professionals must recognize that travel eBusiness is comprised of four continuous phases — not isolated, unrelated processes — supported by the five pillars of merchandising, context, engagement, value, and customer appreciation. Expect travel eBusiness professionals to be asked to become more involved with customer data strategy and for global distribution systems (GDSes) to evolve into more useful global merchandising systems (GMSes).

Authored by Henry H. Harteveldt, the study is sold at $499. Key topics explored in the study include:
*    Travelers Are Fed Up With Bad, Inconsistent Travel eBusiness Experiences
*    The Travel Industry Fiddled With eBusiness While Rome Burned
*    Travelers Will Be Travel Organizations' Advocates, Provided Their Value Is Recognized
*    Weak Economy And Angry Travelers Demand New Travel eBusiness Approach
*    Travel eBusiness Professionals: Use The Four Stages Of Travel eBusiness To Your Technology.

Visit www.forrester.com.

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