Linden Travel Merges with Frosch Travel

Houston-based Frosch Travel (FROSCH) has completed a merger with New York-based Linden Travel, creating a fully integrated travel management company with nationwide presence and firmly establishes FROSCH’s footing on the East Coast. FROSCH reported annual sales of $500 million for 2008, and Linden reported  $113 million.

“FROSCH was carefully chosen because its culture is very similar to Linden’s in that both companies value high-touch service and acknowledge the importance of relationships,” said Barbara Gallay, president of Linden Travel.  "Our service will only be enhanced now that we can offer a truly global reach."

“Our merger with Linden solidifies our presence in New York and positions us to better serve strategic global clients," said Bryan Leibman, president of FROSCH.  "I have the utmost respect for Barbara and look forward to working with her.”

Barbara Gallay met Richard Leibman, chairman of FROSCH, in 1988, and the two have maintained a strong professional rapport for more than 20 years. “This merger was the logical next step for Linden Travel,” noted Gallay, who will continue on as president of the New York City office.

Founded in 1969, Barbara Gallay acquired ownership of Linden in 1975. Linden specializes in providing customized corporate travel management services to numerous industries including financial, entertainment, medical and fashion clientele.

FROSCH is a 37-year-old travel company that sells through its corporate, leisure, incentive, meetings, and groups divisions. FROSCH has been owned and managed by the Leibman family since 1977.

Visit www.frosch.com and www.lindentravel.com.

Read more on:

Suggested Articles:

Chris Conlin, president and CEO of Conlin Travel, sees a future for leisure travel—and it includes DIT (Domestic Independent Travel). Read more here.

Alex Sharpe, John Lovell, Michelle Fee & Drew Daly sound off about CLIA's new health/safety protocols and what they mean to travel advisors.

More than half of all small travel businesses in the U.S. are at risk of either taking longer than six months to recover or never recovering at all.