JetBlue Is Headed to Europe

JetBlue

JetBlue is headed to Europe. The airline has announced plans for multiple daily flights from Boston and New York - JFK to London, marking the carrier’s first European destination and its first transatlantic routes. Plans call for the new service to launch in 2021, although JetBlue said it is still evaluating which London airports it will fly into. 

The move brings JetBlue, which until now has focused on routes within the United States, as well as to the Caribbean and Latin America, into the European market. Officials noted that London is the largest destination not served by the airline from both New York and Boston, and that the city had been a popular request from its customers. 

JetBlue will operate the new flights on the long-range version of the Airbus A321 aircraft, which will include what the carrier describes as a reimagined, transatlantic version of its premium Mint product that will include more lie-flat seats than currently offered on the airline's existing A321s. JetBlue also said that it would create a new long-haul version of its core cabin product designed to appeal to its existing customers. 

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To serve the new routes and tap into new long-haul markets, JetBlue said that it will initially convert 13 aircraft in its existing A321 order book to the long-range version, with the ability to convert more. The new flights to London are subject to receipt of the government operating authority, JetBlue said. 

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