Virgin America Launches Inaugural Flight to Orange County

Virgin America launched its first service to Orange County on Thursday. The airline offers five roundtrips daily between San Francisco International Airport and John Wayne Airport in Santa Ana, CA. These flights start at $49.

"As the only California-based airline, Orange County is an important travel market for us and we couldn't be more pleased to partner with John Wayne Airport to bring our award-winning service to the region," said Virgin America CEO and President David Cush. "We're injecting some healthy competition into the market with low fares, industry-leading service and upscale amenities. We think our unique service will be a breath of fresh air for Orange County's selective travelers."

A surf band will play at the SFO departure gate to celebrate the inaugural flight. Also part of the celebration are live interview via WiFi stream from up in the air and a red carpet welcome at SNA.

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